Complete skiing. Near perfect continuity between flats, uphills and downhills.

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Baaahb
Posts: 94
Joined: Thu Dec 26, 2013 12:03 pm
Location: Teton Valley
Ski style: free heel, touring to turning
Favorite Skis: Boundless, Rossy BC-125, Jaks, BD Converts......
Favorite boots: Alicos, Excursions, T-1's
Occupation: Retired

Re: Complete skiing. Near perfect continuity between flats, uphills and downhills.

Post by Baaahb » Sun Feb 23, 2020 2:15 pm

Adjustable poles are great. I will usually adjust them a few times on any tour, or even at a resort. Shorter for aggressive turning, longer for striding or touring. One of my sets of adjustable poles also has a secondary grip about three inches below the primary grip that I use for short sections, such as the uphill pole on a brief traverse of a steep slope. I cannot see where it becomes a hassle adjusting them. Be sure to get a set that adjusts to a long length as well as a short length; some only go to 135 or so. And only flip lock style connectors, not twist style.

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bgregoire
Posts: 1499
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2014 9:31 am
Ski style: Nordic backcountry touring with lots of turns
Favorite Skis: Fisher E99 & Boundless (98), Åsnes Ingstad, K2 Wayback 88
Favorite boots: Crispi Sydpolen, Alico Teletour & Alfa Polar

Re: Complete skiing. Near perfect continuity between flats, uphills and downhills.

Post by bgregoire » Sun Feb 23, 2020 2:47 pm

Baaahb wrote:
Sun Feb 23, 2020 2:15 pm
Be sure to get a set that adjusts to a long length as well as a short length; some only go to 135 or so. And only flip lock style connectors, not twist style.
The long BD traverse, a classic, goes to 155cm. Good option.

I used to think that about flicklocks only, but now that Asnes came out with a line twist-style poles, I'd be willing to try those out too.
I live for the Telemark arc....The feeeeeeel.....I ski miles to get to a place where there is guaranteed snow to do the deal....TM





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Cannatonic
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Re: Complete skiing. Near perfect continuity between flats, uphills and downhills.

Post by Cannatonic » Sun Feb 23, 2020 3:16 pm

I keep trying to like adjustable poles but end up not using them. Not sure why. I'm usually happy w/ 145 or 155 fixed. I guess I'm not doing much pole-planting on the downhills and 145 seems OK to me. To me the best feature of adjustables is they collapse down to fit into the pack better, good for snowboarding tours.
"All wisdom is to be gained through suffering"
-Will Lange (quoting Inuit chieftan)





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FourthCoast
Posts: 105
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2018 3:55 pm
Ski style: poser

Re: Complete skiing. Near perfect continuity between flats, uphills and downhills.

Post by FourthCoast » Tue Feb 25, 2020 9:58 pm

It is something like 50 deg F and raining in February right now. I wonder if this is driving me mad. I feel compelled to build my own wooden skis.

Does anyone know where I can find detailed step by step plans to build wooden skis with metal edges? At the moment I think I want something like the Gamme 54 but made myself and finished with linseed oil on top and pine tar on the bottom.





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Lo-Fi
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Re: Complete skiing. Near perfect continuity between flats, uphills and downhills.

Post by Lo-Fi » Tue Feb 25, 2020 10:48 pm

Baaahb wrote:
Sun Feb 23, 2020 2:15 pm
Adjustable poles are great. I will usually adjust them a few times on any tour, or even at a resort. Shorter for aggressive turning, longer for striding or touring. One of my sets of adjustable poles also has a secondary grip about three inches below the primary grip that I use for short sections, such as the uphill pole on a brief traverse of a steep slope. I cannot see where it becomes a hassle adjusting them. Be sure to get a set that adjusts to a long length as well as a short length; some only go to 135 or so...
Yep. From the XCd thread:
vt_trees wrote:
Thu Feb 13, 2020 1:03 pm
lowangle al wrote:
Thu Feb 13, 2020 12:56 pm
IMO you can ski your whole life and if your poles are too long you'll never get it right.
This! I couldn't agree more. With the invention of adjustable pole there's no excuse. Somehow people still can't figure it out.
Poling is one of the tricky things to get right in tele skiing. High hands while riding the tele tightrope are extra challenging (this dude is very cool, though):
oldschool47 wrote:
Wed Feb 12, 2020 6:26 pm
This guy is cool. Skis, powder gaiters, hat, jacket. I want to be this guy. I assume it's Brad English.

Image
I find having adjustable poles, that can be shortened on the fly in anticipation of a long downhill , are really helpful and are an important part of my "complete skiing" aspirations.





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FourthCoast
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Ski style: poser

Re: Complete skiing. Near perfect continuity between flats, uphills and downhills.

Post by FourthCoast » Tue Nov 17, 2020 3:14 pm

I saw some snow so I am thinking about skis and bindings.

I really like this Riva II binding. The only issue is it being (long) out of production. I expect everything but the cable will last forever. I would like to be able to make a new cable myself if possible.

Has anyone here successfully made a replacement Riva II cable?





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fisheater
Posts: 1260
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Location: Oakland County, MI
Ski style: All my own, and age doesn't help
Favorite Skis: Gamme 54, Falketind 62, I hope to add a third soon
Favorite boots: Alpina Alaska, Alico Ski March
Occupation: Construction Manager

Re: Complete skiing. Near perfect continuity between flats, uphills and downhills.

Post by fisheater » Wed Nov 18, 2020 11:32 am

You may be interested in these Fourthcoast. I have no experience with this binding, but it appears similar.

https://aspinockwoods.com/shop/ols/products/g3-targa





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FourthCoast
Posts: 105
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Ski style: poser

Re: Complete skiing. Near perfect continuity between flats, uphills and downhills.

Post by FourthCoast » Mon Feb 15, 2021 9:47 am

The lake effect snow machine finally got started up here and has been consistently dropping light fluffy stuff the last week or so. For those of you in the mountains or up in the UP of Michigan this might not seem like a big deal but we have something close to 24" of fluffy snow all the way to the bottom right now.

Anyway... This is deep soft snow for me. Getting up to speed and trying to make some soft snow telemark turns is a lot of fun. It is so smooth and effortless. Very different from the sheets of ice I skied when alpine racing. I also have to keep reminding myself that I can't cross block trees like slalom gates.

But holy crap it is really hard to climb back up out of this stuff. Even on a moderate slope I could not get the kick wax to give me enough traction to move myself up or even sideways. The ski tip would be up on top of the snow and the tail near the bottom. Before I could get any weight on it I would slip backwards and lose progress. It was also too deep to herringbone up the hill because my tips would get quickly burred and I could not lift the ski. The only way I managed to get back up the hill was a very slow side step up. Even then I would lose about half the progress of each step from the snow packing and sliding.

When I made it back to the trail, climbing on packed snow with maybe 3" of fluff on top felt effortless, by comparison.

Is there any technique to make this less exhausting or am I just out of shape and need to build endurance?
Last edited by FourthCoast on Mon Feb 15, 2021 2:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.





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lowangle al
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Re: Complete skiing. Near perfect continuity between flats, uphills and downhills.

Post by lowangle al » Mon Feb 15, 2021 10:16 am

I use a side stepping traverse, one step goes up and forward. when you take your ski off(or out of) the snow place it down so it is somewhat level so you don't slide back. I take big steps, as high and forward as possible and make good terrain decisions so you don't end up struggling on a particularly steep spot or needing to do a kick turn where a tree is in the way. Most importantly try to use the same up track for multiple runs even if it results in going longer distances.





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FourthCoast
Posts: 105
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2018 3:55 pm
Ski style: poser

Re: Complete skiing. Near perfect continuity between flats, uphills and downhills.

Post by FourthCoast » Mon Feb 15, 2021 1:08 pm

Hi Al,

Thanks for taking time to respond. I will keep your advice in mind next time I am out.





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